Podcast Transcript

Speaker 1:

Taking a Walk.

Paul Rogers:

Well, when the audience sings along with the song, that’s the greatest feeling in the world because you really know that they’ve got the message at that point. I like say with Shooting Star or Rock and Roll Fantasy, or even, All Right Now when the audience is singing that with me, it’s amazing.

Buzz Knight:

Welcome to another episode of Taking a Walk, your host Buzz Knight, celebrating another milestone in music history. Where on this episode, we honor the birthday of one of the greatest singers in rock and roll. Paul Rogers has been part of the soundtrack of our life. His band, Bad Company, was the first band signed to Led Zeppelin’s Swan Song label. And as you probably know, he and Jimmy Page would later form The Firm. His music from Free to Bad Company, The Firm and his solo career is classic rock goal. He’s been praised by everyone from the late Freddie Mercury to John Mellencamp for his vocals. Bad Company earned six platinum albums with Rogers. He’s led an amazing life and we celebrate him next on Taking a Walk, with Buzz Knight. Well, I think some special birthday wishes are in order for one of the greatest singers in rock history, Mr. Paul Rogers. Happy birthday, sir.

Paul Rogers:

Well, thank you. I’m so glad I made it this far.

Buzz Knight:

Well, let me ask you, now you have had some documented health issues and we have this other podcast that’s called Music Saved Me about the healing power of music. How important for you as you were healing and getting better was music for you, and do you believe music saves us?

Paul Rogers:

Yeah, definitely. Yeah, because it was very important. I couldn’t play acoustic guitar, I couldn’t play guitar. I couldn’t walk. I couldn’t talk. I couldn’t read, I couldn’t write, but everything was inside me and I knew what was going on, but I just couldn’t communicate outside of my own body and mind and everything else.

But coming back from a stroke is really an amazing journey. It really is because you start to appreciate the little things that you can actually do. And yes, music, just to continue that little point though, you appreciate every little thing that you can do and you build on that and that’s how you recover. And music definitely was a help because as I said, I didn’t couldn’t play. There’s an acoustic sitting there. I didn’t even know what it was, really. I just made noises with it.

Cynthia:

Yeah, it took…

Paul Rogers:

Cynthia’s going to jump in here.

Cynthia:

Hi Buzz. It took about a year and a half for Paul to come back to playing guitar. He started playing guitar. What happened was he had an endarterectomy, the surgery because left carotid artery was 95% locked, and that’s what caused the second major stroke. So after that surgery, he was admitted, left the hospital, and we went for hyperbarics, that was huge. That was like watching a wilted plant come back to life. And then when we got home after that therapy treatment, I had this Stevie guitar in the case on the couch, and I lifted the guitar lit up or the case lit up, sorry. So he could see it and he would walk by and put it down. And this went on for months. And then finally I took the guitar out of the case and left that on the couch.

Paul Rogers:

I knew enough to put the lid down though, did. I was thinking…

Cynthia:

Oh, it’ll get dusty.

Paul Rogers:

Probably shouldn’t be open like that. Yeah.

Cynthia:

The cats will get into it. So anyhow, he eventually, took a year and a half, but he eventually, I found him sitting on the couch with the guitar on his lap, like a slide guitar…

Paul Rogers:

Steel guitar.

Cynthia:

Steel guitar, and playing it, pushing both hands across the strings, pushing away from his body.

Paul Rogers:

And right there, that right there, the vibration of those strings. Everything really is vibration in life. It really is. And the vibration of the strings woke me up, did wake me back up.

Cynthia:

And then he started singing as a result of being able to play again. So it was an interesting process. Don’t recommend it.

Paul Rogers:

No, I don’t recommend it, but it’s certainly an interesting journey. And I do a lot of meditation as well. So I knew that I was cognizant, but I just wasn’t able to have my voice speak the words that I wanted to speak. I could prepare a sentence and go for it, and I would come this garbled thing and I would go, “What the heck did I just say? Who could understand that?” And I could think very clearly, as long as I could do that, I knew that it would come back eventually to me.

Buzz Knight:

Cynthia, it’s so nice to have you on as well with Paul. I really appreciate it. Well, let me ask you, Cynthia, first, does Paul roam around the house quite frequently, singing all day?

Cynthia:

Yes. He sings every day and it’s a best concert ticket. I’ve got front row seat. It’s fantastic. I used to sing, let’s just put it that way. I used to sing, but living with him for the past 26 years, I don’t really sing so much anymore.

Paul Rogers:

Oh, she’s a good singer, actually. She’s on the album believe or not. She’s doing the harmonies.

Cynthia:

So are you, you’re all over that album.

Paul Rogers:

Yeah.

Buzz Knight:

What were you singing today, just by chance?

Paul Rogers:

Oh, today I was singing, “Just a Little Rain Falling from the Sky. The Grass Lifts is Head to the Heavenly Side.” Anyway, I’m starting to get a bit cabaret there. But yeah, that was The Searchers. That was the first song I ever sung. Actually, it was a protest song, strangely enough.

Buzz Knight:

By The Searchers?

Paul Rogers:

Yeah. What Have They Done To The Rain?

Buzz Knight:

Wow, that was magical. I had chills when you were singing that, just so you know.

Paul Rogers:

Oh wow.

Buzz Knight:

Oh man. So what was the first album that you ever bought, Paul?

Paul Rogers:

First album was Otis Redding’s, Otis Blue, and the first single that I bought was his backing band, Red Beans and Rice. His backing band was called Booker Tea and the MGs Red Beans and Rice. And on the other side was Be My Lady. It’s a great record, not very popular. Didn’t sell a lot of records, but I still have a copy of that. It’s really fantastic to listen to.

Buzz Knight:

I love that. Now, what’s the significance for you with Midnight Rows, your new release coming out on Sun Records?

Paul Rogers:

What’s the significance? Well, it’s huge. I actually, I’m very surprised and very pleased to be on Sun Records. It makes a huge difference because they’ve got such a legacy and they’ve got a lot of experience. And I mean, Howlin Wolf and Elvis Presley, it doesn’t get much better than that. That’s a full range of the music, isn’t it, really? So they’ve just been great as well.

Cynthia:

Not bad for a lad from Middlesbrough, I have to say.

Paul Rogers:

Well, yes, I agree with that.

Cynthia:

I don’t even think this was even in your dream wheel.

Paul Rogers:

No, I don’t think it was because it’s true. Because when I was a kid, about 6-year-old or something like that, my best friend… He pulled out his elder brothers Elvis Presley record, right?

Cynthia:

On Sun Records.

Paul Rogers:

On Sun record, of course. And we put it on the turntable, very sneakily, and we put the needle down and we listened to it. It was like… Because that was sacrilege. If we’d been found doing that, we would’ve been crucified. So it was, “Well since my baby left me…” We were like, “Wow, listen to that. Isn’t it great?” So the clarity was unbelievable. It was obviously vinyl, so yeah.

Buzz Knight:

Oh man, that’s so beautiful. And your love of the Blues is so well documented. I mean, you’re a happy fella, but the Blues obviously takes you in a different place. Is that right?

Paul Rogers:

Well, yeah. I had a lot of angst, if you like, growing up as a teenager, et cetera, et cetera. And when I discovered the Blues, I did find that by expressing any sadness that you might’ve had or other people’s sadness for that matter, because we used to cover all the Blues guys as records. Like, “Well, it’s four o’clock in the morning and I’m sitting here waiting…” That one, BB King, and you would sing other people’s blues, but you eventually started to sing your own over the 12 bar blues. And eventually I started to write using the 12 bar blues, and then I expanded out from there. The first song I wrote was Walking My Shadow, which was my own riff. And I put that to a 12 bar, and I went, “Wow.” And I wrote lyrics and I thought, “I’ve just written a song haven’t I? And that was a step forward, and I went on to expand beyond the 12 bar and make all the structures.

Cynthia:

How old were you when you wrote Walk In My Shadow?

Paul Rogers:

I was 17.

Cynthia:

Wow.

Paul Rogers:

Yeah, just before Free.

Cynthia:

Wow. If you listen to those lyrics, if the listeners or the viewers on the podcast listen to those lyrics, they’re pretty heavy lyrics for a 17-year-old.

Paul Rogers:

Yeah. Well, it’s a lot of copying other people really.

Cynthia:

I don’t require.

Paul Rogers:

John Lee. Yeah,

Cynthia:

Yeah. But those lyrics are very unique. I think for a 17-year-old, for any age, actually.

Paul Rogers:

I was walking along the road in Hampstead, and it was a heat wave, and I wrote that song. I went, “Well, my throat is dry, my knees are weak.” I went, “Oh, wait a minute. It’s so damn hot. I can’t even speak…” And all that stuff.

Cynthia:

I didn’t know that.

Paul Rogers:

And then I had to make a riff up and put it all together.

Cynthia:

That’s a good riff.

Paul Rogers:

Yeah. Thank you.

Buzz Knight:

That is beautiful. Now, who are some of the favorite blues players that you’ve encountered personally over your career?

Paul Rogers:

Well, every blues player I’ve heard I liked, I was listening to Hopkins, he’s a cool cat. Wow.

Cynthia:

That you’ve encountered, you’ve met. Is there What of Soul Guys?

Paul Rogers:

Yeah. I saw Muddy Waters at the Marquee in London, in Waldo Street in ’67 I think it was. And I was so impressed because by that time, he was, even by then, he was so much a legend, and there was a big blues boom going on in England at the time. So blues was very popular. It goes through cycles. People often come back to the blues and then it goes away and it comes back. So it’s an evergreen annual.

Cynthia:

You met Wilson…

Paul Rogers:

I saw Muddy Waters, and I was so impressed that he was like a real person. He wasn’t this icon that was separate from the audience in a glass bubble or anything like that. He was very personable and lovely. And actually, I think they were all a bit jetlagged because the drummer, the drummer wasn’t keeping time and Muddy did not like that. I think he’d had a few drinks, perhaps. God bless him. It happens or it used to happen. And so Muddy give the bass player the look, right? And they dragged… Well, they lifted the drummer off. I can’t remember who the players were except for Muddy. And the bass player got on the drums and he did the rest of the night. So it was so natural and free and it was beautiful.

Cynthia:

And then you’ve met BB King, Wilson et cetera.

Paul Rogers:

Yeah, BB was amazing. BB was a fantastic guy. They invited me up on stage and I said, “Are you sure I can go up?” And the manager said, “Look, yes, go on, get up there.” And I went up there and I started to sing. I don’t know whether I was supposed to sing, but I just started to sing, “Every day I had the blues…” Like that. And I suddenly realized I should not really be singing here. And then I turned it back around and I said, “Well, when you see me worry, BB knows…” Or something. Like I changed the lyric around…

Cynthia:

BBs had the blues or something.

Paul Rogers:

And I carried it back to BB and he was like, “Yeah, kid. That’s the way it is. I’m the blues.” Which is true. It definitely, yeah. Anyway.

Buzz Knight:

So what was the first time you encountered Mr. Jimmy Page?

Paul Rogers:

I’d have to think about that. I think I obviously knew their music before I met him. I think I met him at the office, actually. We had… Let me troll back a little bit. We had a road manager in Free when we were Free, and he left us and joined Led Zeppelin’s team as a road manager. And when I was starting to get bad company together, Clive Coleson, he came around and he said, “You should call Peter. He really wants to talk to you.” And I said, Peter, who? He said, “Peter Grant, the manager of Led Zeppelin.”

I said, “He doesn’t care what I’m doing.” He said, “No, no, you really should call him. He really wants to talk to you.” And that’s how my connection with Zeppelin began. I phoned Peter up and I said, “So, hello Peter. How are you?” And I said, “Oh, hey, you might be interested in what I’m doing.” He said, “Well, I’m interested in you.” Because he was a company guy and he’s a huge big wrestler. And I said, “Well, I come with a band, Peter, and we’re called Bad Company.” So he said, “Well, I don’t know about the name…” And the rest is history. But I met Jimmy at the office having established a connection with Peter Grant. We’ve ran into the Zeps all the time.

Buzz Knight:

And Jimmy most recently was at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. I guess he hadn’t been out playing in a while. And everybody’s talking about what he did there with Link Ray. Sounded pretty amazing. Are you still in touch with Jimmy?

Paul Rogers:

Absolutely, yes, indeed.

Cynthia:

Yeah. I’m really proud that he was able to do that for Link Ray.

Paul Rogers:

Absolutely. Yeah, because…

Cynthia:

Kudos where they deserve for sure.

Paul Rogers:

Absolutely.

Cynthia:

Yeah. And it’s cool because Link Ray was an indigenous player, and here in Canada, we really hold our indigenous culture close to our hearts. And so to see that is pretty monumental. Yeah. Good for Jimmy.

Paul Rogers:

Yeah. Jimmy did a great talk to the audience about how brave he felt that Link Ray was. And the record is such a cool record Jumble.

Cynthia:

Perry Margouleff was also involved in that. He’s a behind the scenes guy. He’s the fellow that Paul did the royal sessions with. He’s a wizard. He’s a guitarist. He’s a very good guitarist. But he connects people, would you say…

Paul Rogers:

Some people are wizards.

Cynthia:

Yeah, he is. He connects people. He does a lot of work with Jimmy and Keith Richards and other guitarists. But yeah. Well, tell him the story about the Royal Sessions. How…

Paul Rogers:

Well, he called me up one day, we’d often talked about early soul music and all that stuff, and Isaac Hayes and all those great people. And he said, “Guess where I am? I said, I have no idea where you are, Perry. Tell me.”

Cynthia:

It’s Perry. He could be anywhere. He could be at your front door.

Paul Rogers:

Yeah, he could be outside. That’s right. So I said, I’m down in Memphis and there’s a studio here called the Royal Studios, and this is where a lot of the blues and soul was done. And all the session guys that were on those takes are there, Steve Potts and the Reverend Hodges, Charles Hodges. Charles Hodges, yeah. It was actually really a reverend when he is not a session musician, which is very cool. And he had that big Hammond B3, and all those guys said, “You should come down and we’ll make an album.” I said, “Okay.” I jumped on a plane and we went down there. We did it. It was amazing.

Cynthia:

So those are the sorts of things that Perry Margouleff does in life. He’ll be behind the scenes, but if something cool and is going on, chances are Perry’s had a hand in it or a finger in it, or his whole body into it.

Buzz Knight:

We’ll be right back with more of the Taking a Walk podcast. Welcome back to the Taking a Walk podcast. Tell me about your experiences with the great Jeff Beck.

Paul Rogers:

Wow. Yeah. Well, Jeff Beck, we did so much together over the years. We did… What was that movie we did? We did a movie together. I can’t remember what it was.

Cynthia:

Was it music for the movie?

Paul Rogers:

The music for the movie, yeah. What was it we did? I can’t remember just now. Fair to forgive.

Cynthia:

Someone can Google it.

Paul Rogers:

Yeah, there was one. There was one. But anyway, he was on the tribute to Muddy Waters, and there was a lot of great musicians on that. And by the time I called him up, and by the time we spoke about it, he wanted to do the whole album. And I said, “Well, Jeff, I can’t give you the whole album because we’ve got other people.” We had…

Cynthia:

David Gilmore, Brian May, Slash…

Paul Rogers:

Body Guy.

Cynthia:

Body Guy, yeah.

Paul Rogers:

But there was three tracks left. And he said, “I’ll do them all.” And he did the three tracks that were left at that time, and it was fantastic. He was in a league of his own. He was such an awesome guitar player.

Cynthia:

Yeah, the last tour we did of the US it was Free Spirit. So we had…

Paul Rogers:

With Jeff.

Cynthia:

With Jeff and Anne Wilson and Deborah Bonham. That was quite a… It was so surreal to be because we would flip-flop with Jeff on closing. So on the nights that he would close, we’d be dining in our dressing room and Jeff Beck would be serenading us. And it was so surreal because he was my number one guitarist. And I would just sit there and we’d be eating, I’d go, “It doesn’t get any better than this.” Yeah, what a sweetheart. What an innovator.

Paul Rogers:

Yeah.

Buzz Knight:

How did he make it all look so easy?

Paul Rogers:

Well, I think it was easy for him.

Cynthia:

For him.

Paul Rogers:

But probably not. It is probably, there’s another side to it from his point of view, but it did seem so very easy. Yeah.

Cynthia:

Very focused individual, Jeff. Like laser focused.

Paul Rogers:

Yeah, very. I loved the record he made with Rod Stewart, The Truth album. There are a couple of tracks on there that still blow my mind, really Shapes of Things. “Shapes,” that one. And the guitar solo in that is just out of this world. I love it. Yeah.

Buzz Knight:

The body of work with Bad Company was so unbelievable. Do you think it hurts bands when they’re marketed as super groups?

Paul Rogers:

Well, who knows? I mean, we were marketed as a super group just literally because the last member we got, which was Boz, had spent a couple of months with King Crimson. So that made, We Were Free, the Hoople and King Crimson. So I understand the record company’s desire to promote you, so it’s not a bad thing. You do have to deliver the goods having called yourself a super group though.

Cynthia:

Yeah, that’s true.

Paul Rogers:

Yeah.

Buzz Knight:

I’d say the band did deliver the goods.

Paul Rogers:

Well, thank you.

Buzz Knight:

I mean, unbelievable. So I’m going to cite a particular favorite of mine. There’s so many of them from bad company, but I’ll cite a particular favorite, Silver, Blue, and Gold. Do you remember about the creation of that? Not only lyrically, but musically and then in the studio and everything?

Paul Rogers:

Oh, sure. Yeah. I wrote that on a Walter. Remember the… I’m going to get another Walter one of these days. These, they’re very rare item now to get a good one. In fact, Perry’s on the market, Perry… But they’re such a great piano. They’re electronic, electric piano, but they’ve got a feel to them when you hit them hard, they growled. They’ve got a distortion to them, like an edginess, or you can play them very gently. Anyway, they’re a good piano. And I wrote Silver, Blue, and Gold on that in a little bedset I was living in Putney in London, and the first title was Silver and Gold. But then I thought, “Well give me silver, no blue and Gold, the Color of the Sky and Tall…” And I wrote that like that, and took that to Ponto where we were, Bad company were due to a record. I think it was… What album? It was Run With The Pack. It was it on the Run With The Pack album.

Buzz Knight:

It is one of the greatest songs ever, I have to tell you.

Paul Rogers:

Well, thank you. Thank you, Buzz. And as well, I have to point out, mixed guitar playing is just superb on that, just superb. The soul is so perfect for the track. It’s so delicate and sweet, and those high notes that they plays is just great.

Cynthia:

Buzz, what about that track speaks to you?

Buzz Knight:

Oh my God, it lifts me up. It tugs at my heart, it lifts me up. And it’s like a lot of those in the audience. It’s part of the soundtrack of certainly my life.

Paul Rogers:

Wow. That’s awesome, man.

Buzz Knight:

But I could say that about so many of the songs as well. What do you think is the secret sauce to bands and their collaboration?

Paul Rogers:

I think that the nucleus or the basis of any band is their songs. If they can write songs and then play them, that’s pretty much the secret. And that’s how we started out with Free. We were playing a lot of blues in the set, and I said to Andy, “What we should try and do, what everyone was doing.” Then people like the Cream, like the Cream. Cream, Jimi Hendrix and all those guys, they were playing their own material so that they had their own story and their own voice in a way. And I said, we should concentrate on moving away from the blues a little bit and just focusing on our own material. And we wrote all the way to All Tight Now, and it was really good. But there was one song we couldn’t not do on stage, even though we were doing the whole set of our own material.

And that was The Hunter. And with Albert King, the Hunter, which is still a great record. It’s on The Born Under A Bad Sign album, and Born Under A Bad Sign itself is a great song, great record. We couldn’t get off the stage without playing the Hunter. So I said to Andy, “Let’s try and write a song that is at least as good as The Hunter,” and even something that everybody can sing along to something simple, “All right, right now, baby.”

And I said, “Well, maybe that’s it.” And he took that away and came back with… And all that, you see. So I had to write the lyrics, and so it was like I wanted to end up with, all right now. So something happened before. What Happened Before? Well, it’s a Boy Meets Girl story. And there she stood in the street, what was she doing? Smiling from her head to her feet, big smile. And I said, “Hey, what’s this?” And the lyrics just flowed out like that. And we did that song that night. Anyway, basically, to come to your question, come back to your question. The point is, I think that you collaborate by collaborating, really by getting together and making it work.

Buzz Knight:

How does it make you feel when you either see your fans listening to the music as you’re performing it and you’re connecting with them, or you meet a fan and they tell you how their music, your music has connected with them. How does it make you feel?

Paul Rogers:

Well, when the audience sings along with the song, that’s the greatest feeling in the world. You really know that they’ve got the message at that point. Like say with Shooting Star or Rock and Roll Fantasy, or even, All Right Now, when the audience is singing that with me, it’s amazing. Yeah, it’s a buzz.

Cynthia:

A memory I have is when we were playing Queen Plus, Paul Rogers were on tour and we were playing in Kairka of the Ukraine, and there were 350,000 people at this concert. And it was a benefit concert for AIDS research. And the people could not speak English, but they knew all of the words to All Right Now. And for me, that was a moment that’s stuck in my mind. I thought, “Wow, how amazing. They don’t really know what they’re saying, but yet they know all of the words.”

Paul Rogers:

But they feel good saying it, and it brings people together too. You’re an army then basically, you’re all singing together.

Cynthia:

You’re a clan.

Paul Rogers:

You’re a clan. And it’s such a joyful experience of togetherness.

Cynthia:

Sorry, Buzz. Have you listened to the new album?

Buzz Knight:

Yes, I think it’s joyous. I think it’s just really has an incredible spark and spunk to it, and it’s tremendous.

Paul Rogers:

Oh, thanks Buzz.

Cynthia:

You get good.

Paul Rogers:

You get it. Good. Had you have a favorite track at all?

Buzz Knight:

You know what? I’ve gone through it and just listened start to finish, and that’s how I’ve digested it, to be honest with you.

Paul Rogers:

Yeah, me too. I listened to it. It’s a long time. It takes a long time after you’ve mixed the album, got it all done. To listen to it just as it is, as it sounds, as a listener would, a normal first time listener would hear it because you hear all the things, what you were struggling with through the process of recording it. I remember Florida Shooter and all this kind of stuff. We would struggle. I would struggle with Living It Up too. I wanted to hit the right mark, the right tone, and I tried a number of lyrics to it and all that kind of stuff went on. But now that it’s just there and there’s nothing more you can do, it’s mixed, it’s produced, it’s everything. I can just listen to it as a normal person would. I think it’s quite a good album.

Cynthia:

Yeah, I think it’s a good album.

Paul Rogers:

Yeah. Even with that.

Buzz Knight:

I like just listening. Just as if it’s back to the pure album days.

Paul Rogers:

Yeah, absolutely. Yeah. Always exciting. Was it when you got an album home and it was a great big cover and all the artwork, and you pulled out this vinyl and there it was. I mean, it was a great moment when I pulled out our vinyl and there was Sun Records on the label in the center.

Cynthia:

Whoa.

Paul Rogers:

Yeah. Took me back to the childhood days when we pulled out Elvis Presley. Yeah, I know.

Buzz Knight:

Well, in closing, so let’s play a little bit of a mystical imagination game here. So you’re able to go into the studio with anybody, either in your past of your career that you’ve been with living or dead, or someone you haven’t been in a studio with in your career. Who would that session be with?

Paul Rogers:

Probably Howlin Wolf. When he recorded Smoke Stack Lightning. “Whoa, Smoke Stack Lightning…” Yeah. Yeah.

Cynthia:

Who on drums?

Paul Rogers:

Oh, who on drums?

Cynthia:

Who on bass?

Paul Rogers:

Who on bass? You tell me. Put some suggestions.

Cynthia:

Well, I think Andy Fraser on bass or Pinot Palladino.

Paul Rogers:

Yeah. Well, Boz was pretty good too.

Cynthia:

Oh, Boz was, yeah.

Paul Rogers:

Yeah, he was.

Cynthia:

Okay. So three bass players.

Paul Rogers:

Okay.

Cynthia:

Who do you want on drums? Al Johnson?

Paul Rogers:

I’d have John Bonham on drums.

Cynthia:

Oh yeah.

Paul Rogers:

Yeah.

Cynthia:

Yeah. Okay. And then on keyboards?

Paul Rogers:

Chuck Lavell.

Cynthia:

Yeah. Yeah, I would agree with that. Or Spike Edny too, from Queen. He’s very good. He’s soulful.

Paul Rogers:

Two keyboard players.

Cynthia:

Two keyboard players. Okay. So this is like a symphony rock band. And then what about… Well, I know on guitar.

Paul Rogers:

On guitar. Well, Paul Kosoff actually.

Cynthia:

And how about a little bit of Jimi Hendrix?

Paul Rogers:

Oh, well, he’s not bad too.

Cynthia:

He’s not bad.

Paul Rogers:

You could give him a shot.

Cynthia:

Who could do vocals? Oh, you and Jimi?

Paul Rogers:

No, actually I’d leave it to…

Cynthia:

Jimi?

Paul Rogers:

To Howlin Wolf, to be honest.

Cynthia:

Oh yeah.

Paul Rogers:

What a voice. Yeah, he was like a single plate at 33 and a third the way he sang. Yeah.

Cynthia:

So you’d be the producer of this band?

Paul Rogers:

Yeah.

Cynthia:

There we go. And the manager.

Paul Rogers:

Yeah, I’d be the manager too.

Buzz Knight:

Well, I am so grateful for this time, Cynthia and Paul and Paul, happiest of birthday to you and great health, and thanks for the joy that you’ve given us with all of your music and that you continue to give us with your music. Thanks for this virtual edition of the Taking A Walk podcast. It’s really been fantastic.

Paul Rogers:

Well, thank you. It’s been my pleasure, Buzz. It really has.

Cynthia:

It’s been a buzz, Buzz.

Buzz Knight:

Thank you, Cynthia. Thank you, Paul.

Cynthia:

Take care. And I love your dog picture. Is that your dog? A Spaniel?

Buzz Knight:

Yeah, that’s Elmer.

Cynthia:

Elmer. Oh, he’s gorgeous.

Buzz Knight:

Thank you.

Cynthia:

You’re welcome.

Buzz Knight:

Oh, bless you both.

Cynthia:

Bless you too.

Paul Rogers:

Bless you too.

Cynthia:

Take care.

Paul Rogers:

Bye now.

Speaker 1:

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About The Author

Buzz Knight

Buzz Knight is an established media executive with a long history of content creation and multi-platform distribution.

After a successful career as a Radio Executive, he formed Buzz Knight Media which focuses on strategic guidance and the development of new original content.